August 22, 2014
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“Do what you love” disguises the fact that being able to choose a career primarily for personal reward is a privilege, a sign of socioeconomic class. Even if a self-employed graphic designer had parents who could pay for art school and co-sign a lease for a slick Brooklyn apartment, she can bestow DWYL as career advice upon those covetous of her success.

If we believe that working as a Silicon Valley entrepreneur or a museum publicist or a think-tank acolyte is essential to being true to ourselves, what do we believe about the inner lives and hopes of those who clean hotel rooms and stock shelves at big-box stores? The answer is: nothing.

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Do what you love, love what you do: An omnipresent mantra that’s bad for work and workers. (via bakcwadrs)

a couple of other quotes from the article i really like:

According to this way of thinking, labor is not something one does for compensation but is an act of love. If profit doesn’t happen to follow, presumably it is because the worker’s passion and determination were insufficient. Its real achievement is making workers believe their labor serves the self and not the marketplace

and

Do what you love and you’ll never work a day in your life! Before succumbing to the intoxicating warmth of that promise, it’s critical to ask, “Who, exactly, benefits from making work feel like nonwork?” “Why should workers feel as if they aren’t working when they are?” In masking the very exploitative mechanisms of labor that it fuels, DWYL is, in fact, the most perfect ideological tool of capitalism. If we acknowledged all of our work as work, we could set appropriate limits for it, demanding fair compensation and humane schedules that allow for family and leisure time.

(via mercy-misrule)

the obvious alternative is to work a job that supports you without while giving you enough free time and resources to do what you actually love, which of course is terrible because it encourages people to find self-worth and fulfillment outside of their employment and we can’t have that.

(via gracklesong)

(via optimistic-red-velvet-walrus)

August 22, 2014
lovelyandbrown:

thisiseverydayracism:

The prison-industrial complex is just a myth…right?

Jesus he didn’t even have us do the damn math. He just said it.

lovelyandbrown:

thisiseverydayracism:

The prison-industrial complex is just a myth…right?

Jesus he didn’t even have us do the damn math. He just said it.

(via jimmyslice6)

August 22, 2014
Coalition of Anti-Racist Whites

white social workers who want to dismantle white supremacy, check these folks out. learn from your people on how to work and fight the good fight, learn how to use your white privilege with the least damage to people of color. 

August 22, 2014

Laura Flanders: LF

Scot Nakagawa: SN

Transcript of video:

LF: My guest is Scot Nakagawa, he’s senior partner at ChangeLab, which is a grassroots institute for racial equity. He’s also a long time activist in the LGBT movements, and the fight the right campaigns of the 1990s, and, he’s just started a blog, racefiles.com. Scot, it’s great to have you. You’ve moved to New York, we’re glad to have you, after been working in the west for many years. You’ve also launched a blog that if people read it today, it’s called Race Files, if people read it today, they would see a lot of discussion on anti-Black racism. We’ve been talking about Asians, but, you’re focused a lot on lifting the oppression of African Americans. Why? Why has that been a priority for you for so long?

SN: Well, lifting up the oppression faced by African Americans I believe is really critical, to address the issue of race in general in the United States. And so I really see it um, as, uh, you know, something that I have believed is important because I believe that my liberation is tied to the liberation of African Americans. I believe that the liberation of people of color in this country in general is tied to the liberation of African Americans and of all people of color. I see African Americans, or at least anti-Black racism, as the fulcrum of white supremacy. So, if whiteness is the lever, and white privilege is the lever, um, that anti-Black racism is the thing that gives that lever power. It’s the rock underneath the —- [Scot makes up and down hand gestures]

LF: Explain that historically, why so?

SN: Well, I believe that race is an idea, that was constructed originally in order to justify the enslavement of African Americans or of Africans. And, um, that, historically, we have, as a country, um have created a set of legal codes, created a constitution, created a federal system, all in order to accommodate slavery. And, in each generation as we did so, that we continue to build on this idea of African people, or African descended people, as this permanent other. That a threat, a you know, a group to be exploited, and that have um, built an entire politics around that notion. 

LF: What do you think is the legacy of that, for the possibility of creating some new economic relations, as people are constantly trying to do, and i think particularly right now?

SN: Well I think that we need to now, deal with the fact that, for the most part, without perhaps being able to articulate it, white people in america view white privilege as something that has a real cash value. You know, it’s worth money. It has historically been worth money. You know historically, you could sue someone for saying you were Black if you weren’t, and get a cash settlement, but you couldn’t do the opposite. You couldn’t sue someone for saying you were white if you weren’t. Because that would be considered, to your advantage. So you know, there is this perception, that there is a cash value associated with whiteness, and I think that where we see people fighting over issues like Affirmative Action get put on the table. This notion that somehow by having that privilege eroded, that your economic status will be instantly affected by it. And so I think that that’s one problem. I also think that we have another problem, it’s more of a social, ideological problem. Um, I think, you know, that the history of villyfy-ing people of color, particularly Native Americans and African Americans, has had the intention of causing African Americans and Native Americans in particular, to be viewed as less than human by white people, to in other words be dehumanized. But it had the opposite effect, and really dehumanized white people, in the sense that their understanding of what it means to be human is limited by race. You know, it’s very difficult for people to understand what are human needs, if they are defined in terms of race. You know, we have much more in common than people would like to imagine. But we continually limit ourselves in understanding how we are to serve our society, and to see how the various needs of different people in society, regardless of race, are connected to one another. 

August 22, 2014
postracialcomments:

atane:

atane:

This is a story that isn’t getting the traction in the press that it should. I posted the case about Howard Morgan not long ago here.
Morgan was a veteran police officer in Chicago. He is black. He was shot 28 times by 4 white officers. 21 of those shots were administered to the back of his body. Morgan never fired a weapon, and a witness corroborated that. In fact, one of the officers took Morgan’s weapon away from him. Morgan was acquitted of aggravated discharge of a weapon in 2007. 
Some key facts via this online petition

Howard Morgan’s van was crushed and destroyed without notice or cause before any forensic investigation could be done. The State only produced 3 of the 28 bullets shot into and taken from Howard Morgan’s body, whereby the rest of the 25 bullets could have shown whether or not the police officers who shot Mr. Morgan shot him with his own gun after taking it from him. Howard Morgan was never tested for gun residue to confirm if he even fired a weapon on the morning in question. The State never produced the actual bullet proof vest worn by one of the officers who claimed to have allegedly taken a shot directly into the vest on the morning in question. The State only produced a replica.

Despite all this, and the fact that Morgan was earlier acquitted of firing his own weapon, Morgan was found guilty of attempted murder of the 4 white officers who shot him 28 times, with 21 of those shots having entry points on the back of his body. How does one not fire a weapon, get shot 28 times by four officers, and then be found guilty of attempted murder? It doesn’t make sense.
Morgan is set to be sentenced in April. More info here.

Since people insist on contacting to tell me “not all cops”, I’ll be reblogging old posts of the most egregious cases of police brutality. This isn’t about individual “nice” cops. This is about a systemic problem. Good cops are forced to tow the line or they will get dealt with. No one is denying that cops have a tough job. Who said they didn’t? Isn’t that what they signed up for? Don’t jump in the lion’s den and then complain about lions.
The case above is about a Black Chicago cop named Howard Morgan. Why his case didn’t gain national attention beats me. He was shot 28 times by fellow officers, and 21 of those shots came from behind. He survived somehow. One officer took his weapon away from him. Black cops are not safe either.

The cops werent charged either

postracialcomments:

atane:

atane:

This is a story that isn’t getting the traction in the press that it should. I posted the case about Howard Morgan not long ago here.

Morgan was a veteran police officer in Chicago. He is black. He was shot 28 times by 4 white officers. 21 of those shots were administered to the back of his body. Morgan never fired a weapon, and a witness corroborated that. In fact, one of the officers took Morgan’s weapon away from him. Morgan was acquitted of aggravated discharge of a weapon in 2007. 

Some key facts via this online petition

Howard Morgan’s van was crushed and destroyed without notice or cause before any forensic investigation could be done.

The State only produced 3 of the 28 bullets shot into and taken from Howard Morgan’s body, whereby the rest of the 25 bullets could have shown whether or not the police officers who shot Mr. Morgan shot him with his own gun after taking it from him.

Howard Morgan was never tested for gun residue to confirm if he even fired a weapon on the morning in question.

The State never produced the actual bullet proof vest worn by one of the officers who claimed to have allegedly taken a shot directly into the vest on the morning in question. The State only produced a replica.

Despite all this, and the fact that Morgan was earlier acquitted of firing his own weapon, Morgan was found guilty of attempted murder of the 4 white officers who shot him 28 times, with 21 of those shots having entry points on the back of his body. How does one not fire a weapon, get shot 28 times by four officers, and then be found guilty of attempted murder? It doesn’t make sense.

Morgan is set to be sentenced in April. More info here.

Since people insist on contacting to tell me “not all cops”, I’ll be reblogging old posts of the most egregious cases of police brutality. This isn’t about individual “nice” cops. This is about a systemic problem. Good cops are forced to tow the line or they will get dealt with. No one is denying that cops have a tough job. Who said they didn’t? Isn’t that what they signed up for? Don’t jump in the lion’s den and then complain about lions.

The case above is about a Black Chicago cop named Howard Morgan. Why his case didn’t gain national attention beats me. He was shot 28 times by fellow officers, and 21 of those shots came from behind. He survived somehow. One officer took his weapon away from him. Black cops are not safe either.

The cops werent charged either

(via socialworkhelper)

August 21, 2014

hey everybody, i’m interested in things you want to find out. i value critical pedagogy and want to engage TINSW followers in what it is and how we can put this theory into our day to day practice (praxis!). what do you want to know, what do you want to talk about, how can TINSW help you in questioning the stories given to you by the dominant culture in academia? 

BTW re-reading pedagogy of the oppressed for summer reading. wanna join me? 

2:24pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZJM__n1OrYdXK
  
Filed under: ask 
August 20, 2014
Ferguson from my TL- August 18 (2/3)

thewilsonblog:

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Ways you can help:

https://twitter.com/SheSeauxSaditty

http://afro-dykey.tumblr.com/post/95096989345/things-you-can-do-for-ferguson

(via proteanarts)

4:01am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZJM__n1OkK7Vh
  
Filed under: reblog ferguson 
August 20, 2014
Self care list: how to take care of your self while learning about oppression (with unaware people)

fabianswriting:

This is not a complete list and feel free to suggest anything. I recognize that I hold privilege for having the time and energy to put this together, and hope that my footprint in the world leads to more people of color and marginalized people going through this and utilizing my experience as a…

August 18, 2014

samjoonyuh:

Perspective. 

(via islandofmisfitbloggers)

8:08pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZJM__n1OcsRY-
  
Filed under: ferguson reblog 
August 18, 2014

thecutestofthecute:

itsmisseinstein:

Freaking adorable !

The 8th one is obviously fake.

Because self care