September 17, 2014
if you’re in the ann arbor/washtenaw county/ypsilanti area, consider attending this event! <3
“Educational Equity Beyond Access: Supporting Undocumented Students and Their Communities This event is the first of a year-long series of events sponsored by the National Center for Institutional Diversity (NCID) and the National Forum on Higher Education for the Public Good (the Forum) that will focus on the intersections between immigration and education. Throughout the series, NCID and the Forum will highlight the collaborative work of well-known speakers from universities, politics, foundations and advocacy organizations to describe the challenges faced by undocumented immigrants and their communities and consider innovative and collaborative ways to address these challenges. This panel presentation will frame the series by featuring representatives from diverse arenas–politics, academia, foundations and advocacy groups–that are working on projects to address the challenges of immigrant communities. If you plan to attend this program please RSVP by visiting the NCID website link. 

if you’re in the ann arbor/washtenaw county/ypsilanti area, consider attending this event! <3

Educational Equity Beyond Access: Supporting Undocumented Students and Their Communities This event is the first of a year-long series of events sponsored by the National Center for Institutional Diversity (NCID) and the National Forum on Higher Education for the Public Good (the Forum) that will focus on the intersections between immigration and education. Throughout the series, NCID and the Forum will highlight the collaborative work of well-known speakers from universities, politics, foundations and advocacy organizations to describe the challenges faced by undocumented immigrants and their communities and consider innovative and collaborative ways to address these challenges. This panel presentation will frame the series by featuring representatives from diverse arenas–politics, academia, foundations and advocacy groups–that are working on projects to address the challenges of immigrant communities. If you plan to attend this program please RSVP by visiting the NCID website link

September 16, 2014
"In the 1890s, when Freud was in the dawn of his career, he was struck by how many of his female patients were revealing childhood [sexual] victimization to him. Freud concluded that child sexual abuse was one of the major causes of emotional disturbances in adult women and wrote a brilliant and humane paper called “The Aetiology of Hysteria.” However, rather than receiving acclaim from his colleagues for his ground-breaking insights, Freud met with scorn. He was ridiculed for believing that men of excellent reputation (most of his patients came from upstanding homes) could be perpetrators of incest.
Within a few years, Freud buckled under this heavy pressure and recanted his conclusions. In their place he proposed the “Oedipus complex,” which became the foundation of modern psychology… Freud used this construct to conclude that the episodes of abuse his clients had revealed to him had never taken place; they were simply fantasies of events the women had wished for… This construct started a hundred-year history in the mental health field of blaming victims for the abuse perpetrated on them and outright discrediting of women’s and children’s reports of mistreatment by men."

— ― Lundy Bancroft (via proletarianprincess)

(Source: womensliberationfront, via enumerate)

September 15, 2014

houseofkarekare:

I need you to think about why in order for you to care about my safety you have to relate to me as a sister niece daughter wife mom grandma or whatever as if I need to prove my femininity in order for you to care
Do you know I am a person and just by virtue of being a person I deserve respect, my body and mind to be safe, as I feel you do too? Chew on that shit ok

September 15, 2014
loveisrespect:

Helping a Co-Worker in an Abusive Relationship
When you’re at work, you’re probably not talking with your co-workers about really personal stuff. But if you find out that one of your co-workers is in an unhealthy or abusive relationship, you can help them by knowing how to show your support.
The most important thing you can do for your co-worker is let them know you’re there for them. If they’re coming to you for support, they’re putting their trust in you. Listen to them, and avoid judging or offering advice; instead, acknowledge their feelings and help them recognize that abuse is not normal or their fault. You might say things like, “You don’t deserve to be treated like that” or “You deserve to be respected.” 
If your co-worker fears for their safety from their partner while at work, you can help them create a safety plan. You might encourage them to speak with a manager or the HR department who can explain any policies about how the company responds to domestic or dating violence among employees. If you’re a manager, you could talk to them about what the company can do to help them, such as giving them time off for a court hearing. Talk to your co-worker about what would help them feel safe coming to and leaving work, whether that’s getting college campus security to escort them home, or walking them out yourself to the parking lot. 
Your co-worker may not tell you what their partner or ex looks like, but if they do, keep an eye out to see if they come in the workplace. If they do come in, don’t reveal information about your co-worker, like their schedule or where they take their breaks, because the abusive partner could use that information to stalk or keep tabs on your co-worker. Additionally, if your co-worker says they have a restraining order against their partner and expresses they want the police involved, you can help enforce that by calling the police if their partner shows up at the workplace.
It’s hard to find great people who you enjoy working with, so you may not want to lose someone as a co-worker. However, if it’s an issue of their safety — as well as the safety of other employees — it may be best to see if additional job sites can relocate them. If you’re working at a chain restaurant or retail store, for instance, your co-worker might be able to transfer to another location. Or if you’re working on a college campus, there may be somewhere else on-campus that’s hiring. If your co-worker needs to leave their job because of their relationship, it’s good to note that some states offer unemployment benefits to people who have left their jobs due to dating or domestic abuse. 
Abusive relationships can happen to anyone, anywhere. To help keep your workplace safer, brush up on the warning signs of abuse and learn how to be a part of someone’s support system. You can always call, text, or chat with a peer advocate at loveisrespect for more information and resources!

loveisrespect:

Helping a Co-Worker in an Abusive Relationship

When you’re at work, you’re probably not talking with your co-workers about really personal stuff. But if you find out that one of your co-workers is in an unhealthy or abusive relationship, you can help them by knowing how to show your support.

The most important thing you can do for your co-worker is let them know you’re there for them. If they’re coming to you for support, they’re putting their trust in you. Listen to them, and avoid judging or offering advice; instead, acknowledge their feelings and help them recognize that abuse is not normal or their fault. You might say things like, “You don’t deserve to be treated like that” or “You deserve to be respected.” 

If your co-worker fears for their safety from their partner while at work, you can help them create a safety plan. You might encourage them to speak with a manager or the HR department who can explain any policies about how the company responds to domestic or dating violence among employees. If you’re a manager, you could talk to them about what the company can do to help them, such as giving them time off for a court hearing. Talk to your co-worker about what would help them feel safe coming to and leaving work, whether that’s getting college campus security to escort them home, or walking them out yourself to the parking lot. 

Your co-worker may not tell you what their partner or ex looks like, but if they do, keep an eye out to see if they come in the workplace. If they do come in, don’t reveal information about your co-worker, like their schedule or where they take their breaks, because the abusive partner could use that information to stalk or keep tabs on your co-worker. Additionally, if your co-worker says they have a restraining order against their partner and expresses they want the police involved, you can help enforce that by calling the police if their partner shows up at the workplace.

It’s hard to find great people who you enjoy working with, so you may not want to lose someone as a co-worker. However, if it’s an issue of their safety — as well as the safety of other employees — it may be best to see if additional job sites can relocate them. If you’re working at a chain restaurant or retail store, for instance, your co-worker might be able to transfer to another location. Or if you’re working on a college campus, there may be somewhere else on-campus that’s hiring. If your co-worker needs to leave their job because of their relationship, it’s good to note that some states offer unemployment benefits to people who have left their jobs due to dating or domestic abuse. 

Abusive relationships can happen to anyone, anywhere. To help keep your workplace safer, brush up on the warning signs of abuse and learn how to be a part of someone’s support system. You can always call, text, or chat with a peer advocate at loveisrespect for more information and resources!

September 15, 2014
"Cross-racial struggle made clear the work that white women needed to do in order for cross-racial sisterhood to really be powerful. Among the directives were the following: Don’t expect women of color to be your educators, to do all the bridge work. White women need to be the bridge - a lot of the time. Do not lump African American, Latina, Asian American, and Native American women into one category. History, culture, imperialism, language, class, region, and sexuality make the concept of a monolithic “women of color” indefensible. Listen to women of color’s anger. It is informed by centuries of struggle, erasure, and experience. White women, look to your own history for signs of heresy and rebellion. Do not take the histories of Black, Latina, or Native American women as your own. They are not and never were yours."

— Becky Thompson, “Multiracial Feminism: Recasting the Chronology of Second Wave Feminism,” in Nancy Hewitt, ed., No Permanent Waves: Recasting Histories of U.S. Feminisms (via ohgeeznora)

(via houseofkarekare)

September 13, 2014

(Source: mississippistreet, via con-toda-mi-alma)

September 12, 2014
"

I know that Black creativity has saved your life many times before. I know, because I’ve seen it happen. I’ve listened as non-Black people in my communities raised on Hip Hop talked about how it was the only relatable, empowering culture they found that also educated and radicalized them as a youth. It was formational. I’ve watched people become politicized, shaping their new political identities after bell hooks, Audre Lorde, Assata Shakur, Angela Davis and Frantz Fanon. I’ve watched as folks become activist celebrities using radical ideas from Black Power and Civil Rights movements to shape programs that do not benefit Black people. I’ve watched as people make livings and loads of social capital off of DJing Black music, dancing, walking and dressing like Black people, selling the Black aesthetic to others. I’ve heard that friends use Nina Simone and Sade to sing them back from depression, Rihanna and D’Angelo to get them in the mood. So many people in my communities, lately, have been using Octavia Butler to renew their hope for radical futures. Without Black people, what would your lives be? You might be thinking, you know, it’s so much more complicated than all this, race is complex, we’re all part of the human family, etc., etc…

Black art is not free for all damaged souls. When Nina sang about strange fruit, she was talking about a lynching…of Black people. When Black rappers say Fuck the Police, they speak to a state system of lynching…Black people. Your pain and isolation, however real it may be, is not the same as being Black. Your self-adoption into hip hop and djembe drumming and spoken word, makes our art forms all about you. You, however well meaning, have stolen Black labour and invention and used it for your own purpose. It warps the medium and changes the message, the magic, the healing. From now on, consider how the cost of consuming, appropriating, regurgitating, and getting your life in multiple ways from Black art, Black culture, and Black peoples’ creative genius detrimentally impacts our lives. Being Black in an anti-black world means experiencing daily attacks that threaten our dignity, our happiness, our freedom, and often our lives; and in order to enjoy Black culture, you’re going to have to take action to help get these back.

But because Black people’s labour, language, intelligence, creativity, and survival arts have always been considered free for the taking, you probably didn’t feel ways about using it. You probably didn’t think twice. Black culture is the most pilfered, the most ‘borrowed,’ the most thieved culture, and we’ve seen this happen time and tie again.

"

Nadijah Robinson

Quote is from her essay Black Art Is Not A Free For All on Black Girl Dangerous. Read it all. Truly exquisite writing, especially as non-Black people continue to use, consume, pilfer, plagiarize and be appropriative of Black cultural production and art while simultaneously suggesting that Black culture, especially that Black American culture, does not exist. 

I’ve also watched non-Black people suggest Black people contribute “nothing” to anti-oppression theory or praxis while their ENTIRE FRAMEWORK for approaching it is via Black cultural production or Black women’s epistemology.

Like…the cognitive dissonance proffered via perspectives shaped by anti-Blackness is astounding.

(via gradientlair)

“Being Black in an anti-black world means experiencing daily attacks that threaten our dignity, our happiness, our freedom, and often our lives”
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“Being Black in an anti-black world…”
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Nadijah, thank you for writing this and articulating this PRECISELY! I was reading this with my hand over my heart, nodding at every sentence and relishing the way these words spoke out loud feelings and struggles I live with, that are often hard to express. Especially to other non-black poc. So I’m reading and loving every word and get to the end and see your name (!!!) and feel so lucky to know you and that we get to share the same air. Congrats on having your excellence documented and shared!

(via patchworkpoetics)

(via prettyofcenter)

September 12, 2014
purdue OWL is not just for learning APA style citations

have you checked out purdue owl yet? for all of yall that have to write anything —- it’s a great resource. i got asked to write a letter of recommendation and, owl has some really good advice for anyone who is needing a letter of recommendation and folks who need to write one. 

they’re also a great resource for other writing needs like

-lit reviews

-annotated bib

-etc etc etc 

September 11, 2014
cosmicqt:

Hey look! Here are some resources written by ACTUAL two-spirit people, compiled by a two-spirit person! You will find no Roscoe or Williams here (yuck). We can speak for ourselves, thank you VERY much.
(Also, let that stupid quote plastered over Pretty Shield’s face “Christian leaders, stand on our soil and claim: “gay marriage” has never occurred here. Over 130 tribes in every region of North America blah blah BLAH” that’s not actually attributed to anyone DIE. STOP USING IT. IT IS DISRESPECTFUL. Look, it’s me and my big brother’s shirt we wore one day to rep instead. PHEW, that’s SO MUCH BETTER.)
Open Access Articles/Resources
Cameron, Michelle. “Two Spirited Aboriginal People: Continuing Cultural Appropriation by Non-Aboriginal Society”
National Aboriginal Health Organization (NAHO). “Suicide Prevention and Two-Spirited People”
Jill Alaers. Two-Spirited People and Social Work Practice: Exploring the History of Aboriginal Gender and Sexual Diversity
Buy | Find in library | Access through university/college databases
Wilson, Alex. “N’Tacimowin Innah Nah’: Our Coming In Stories”
Wilson, Alex. “How we find ourselves: Identity development and two-spirit people”
Wilson, Alex. “Two-spirit identity”.
Gregory Scofield. “You Can Always Count on an Anthropologist (To Set You Straight, Crooked or Somewhere In-Between)” in Me Sexy: An Exploration of Native Sex and Sexuality. 
Queer Indigenous Studies: Critical Interventions in Theory, Politics and Literature. Eds. Qwo-Li Driskill, Chris Finley, Brian Joseph Gilley, and Scott Lauria Morgensen
Driskill, Qwo-Li . “Doubleweaving Two-Spirit Critiques: Building Alliances between Native and Queer 
This is by no means meant to be exhaustive. My fellow 2S folks, please add more that you know written by-and-for us!

cosmicqt:

Hey look! Here are some resources written by ACTUAL two-spirit people, compiled by a two-spirit person! You will find no Roscoe or Williams here (yuck). We can speak for ourselves, thank you VERY much.

(Also, let that stupid quote plastered over Pretty Shield’s faceChristian leaders, stand on our soil and claim: “gay marriage” has never occurred here. Over 130 tribes in every region of North America blah blah BLAH” that’s not actually attributed to anyone DIE. STOP USING IT. IT IS DISRESPECTFUL. Look, it’s me and my big brother’s shirt we wore one day to rep instead. PHEW, that’s SO MUCH BETTER.)

Open Access Articles/Resources

Buy | Find in library | Access through university/college databases

  • Wilson, Alex. “N’Tacimowin Innah Nah’: Our Coming In Stories”
  • Wilson, Alex. “How we find ourselves: Identity development and two-spirit people”
  • Wilson, Alex. “Two-spirit identity”.
  • Gregory Scofield. “You Can Always Count on an Anthropologist (To Set You Straight, Crooked or Somewhere In-Between)” in Me Sexy: An Exploration of Native Sex and Sexuality.
  • Queer Indigenous Studies: Critical Interventions in Theory, Politics and Literature. Eds. Qwo-Li Driskill, Chris Finley, Brian Joseph Gilley, and Scott Lauria Morgensen
  • Driskill, Qwo-Li . “Doubleweaving Two-Spirit Critiques: Building Alliances between Native and Queer

This is by no means meant to be exhaustive. My fellow 2S folks, please add more that you know written by-and-for us!

(via floralthighs)

September 10, 2014
Surgeons Accepting Medicare For FTM and MTF Surgeries